Videos

Click HERE to view videos on VIMEO by Agua Dulce Dance Theater.

A Conversation in Dance with Julie Mehretu’s Stadia III (2015)–How…do you dance in response to works of art? This gallery program explored the connection between dance and visual works of art. On Friday, May 15, 2015, dancer and choreographer Alicia Díaz discussed the elements of dance improvisation and performed in the 21st century galleries. She was joined by percussionist Héctor “Coco” Barez. Performed at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts.

There I Go Rising

 

(2017)–There I Go Rising, is a solo created and performed in conversation with Maya Angelou’s poem “And Still I Rise.” The piece explores themes of resilience that integrate complementary opposites—defiance and playfulness, bitterness and reconciliation, pain and triumph. The movement vocabulary references gestures found in dances of the African diaspora, like the Puerto Rican bomba, that have historically served as embodied forms of resistance. Performed at RADFest (Midwest Regional Alternative Dance Festival).

portrait of an imagined deity–trio

 

(2017)“portrait of an imagined deity” is informed by archetypes of mother, lover, and warrior evoked by different deities present in African diasporic cultures. The music was created in 1979 for the production of Atibón, Ogú, Erzulí by the Puerto Rican mime company Taller de Histriones. This excerpt of the music is used with permission from composer Emmanuel “Sunshine” Logroño. Performed by University Dancers of The University of Richmond at the Alice Jepson Theatre of the Modlin Center for the Arts (2017).

portrait of an imagined deity–solo (2016) –“portrait of an imagined deity” is informed by archetypes of mother, lover, and warrior evoked by different deities present in African diasporic cultures. The music was created in 1979 for the production of Atibón, Ogú, Erzulí by the Puerto Rican mime company Taller de Histriones. This excerpt of the music is used with permission from composer Emmanuel “Sunshine” Logroño. Performed by Alicia Díaz at Princeton University’s Diasporic Body Grammar: An Encounter of Movements and Words, and by Christina Carlotti Kolb in conjunction with an installation by Jeannette Betancourt at the Museo y Centro de Estudios Humanísticos, Universidad del Turabo, Puerto Rico  (2017).

Talking in Sicá

 

(2016)–This collaboration between Alicia Díaz and Puerto Rican percussionist Héctor “Coco” Barez is inspired by the Puerto Rican music and dance form bomba, developed during slavery and characterized by the improvisational dialogue between dancer and drummer. The piece is anchored in the sicá bomba rhythm while experimenting with both instrumentation and movement vocabulary that go well beyond the boundaries of the pure form, yet maintaining the integrity of the rhythmic structure at the center of their conversation. Through this methodology, I am engaging in a dialogue between tradition and individuality, between the past and the now, and between dance forms and vocabularies that are part of my personal history as a Puerto Rican woman and as a contemporary dance artist. Performed at Movement Research at the Judson Church (2016); Puerto Rican Soundscapes: Exploring Puerto Rican Heritage Stateside Through Roots, Jazz, and Classical Music @ Center for Puerto Rican Studies, Hunter College, CUNY (2016); and Museo y Centro de Estudio Humanísticos, Universidad del Turabo (2017).

Deep Listening

 

(2015)–Deep Listening is a conversation between movement and sound, between dancer and musician, and between cultural memory and identity. Integrating improvisation and contemporary dance with references to the traditional Puerto Rican music and dance form bomba, this work is the result of an ongoing collaboration between Alicia Díaz and Puerto Rican percussionist Héctor “Coco” Barez. Performed at The Pregones Theater in Bronx, New York; Richmond Dance Festival; Casa de Cultura Ruth Hernández Torres, Puerto Rico.

algún día…someday

 

(2012)–Co-choreographed by Alicia Díaz and Matthew Thornton.  Set to music by Felipe Pirela, and Tom Waits.  Performed in The 2015 Richmond Dance Festival at Dogtown Dance Theatre. Live vocals by  Joaquín José García, piano by Tyler Tillage, percussion by Héctor “Coco” Barez. Originally performed at  Food for Thought Series “Urban Conversations: City as Choreographer” curated by Jane Gabriels at Danspace Project in the East Village/St. Mark’s Church/Danspace Project in New York City; 2015 Richmond Dance Festival; Pregones Theater, Bronx, New York.

Memory and Resonance

 

(2014)–Structured improvisation in collaboration with Puerto Rican percussionist Héctor “Coco” Barez. The piece was inspired by two prints 1) “Resonance IV” by Mika Aono Boyd, and 2) “I Still See Them” by Rashaun Rucker. It explores ideas of collective historical memory in relationship to the cycles of racial violence that still plagues American society, and at the same time, of dignity and fortitude. Performed at The Joel and Lila Harnett Museum of Art at The University of Richmond.

12

 

(2014)An autobiographical solo that deals with issues of identity, migration and race in the United States. The piece integrates movement, text and storytelling. Performed at The George Washington University.

down by the riverside, i remember you

 

(2014)–A film by Alicia Díaz in collaboration with Matthew Thornton.  Created during the New Media course, with Professor Ludovic Jolivet, for the Dance M.F.A. Program at The George Washington University. Screened at the 2015 ACDA at Towson University. Awarded prize of the 2015 Richmond Dance Film Festival.

self-portrait/in the studio

 

(2014)–Filmed by Sarah Smith. Edited by Alicia Díaz. Music by Nádia Leirião. This is Assignment 10–Video Self-Portrait for the New Media course, with Professor Ludovic Jolivet, for the Dance M.F.A. Program at The George Washington University.

Staircase

 

(2014)–Filmed and edited by Sarah Smith.  Choreography by Alicia Díaz.  This is Assignment 8–Continuity for the New Media course, with Professor Ludovic Jolivet, for the Dance M.F.A. Program at The George Washington University.

Pine Chapel

 

(2013)–Filmed and edited by KimSu Theiler during the 2013 Art Farm residency at Yellow Barn Farm in Northeast Ohio.  Choreography by Alicia Díaz, Matthew Thornton, and Thayer Jonutz.

3 ó 4 jugadas (2000)–Quartet commissioned by Andanza: Compañía Puertorriqueña de Danza Contemporánea, Puerto Rico. The work was directed by Alicia Díaz in collaboration with dancers Rodney Rivera and Carlos Iván Santos, vocalist José Luis Abreu “Fofé”, lighting designer Antonio González Walker and costume designer Freddie Mercado. Performed in the Teatro de Bellas Artes (1999), Cuba (2000), and Mexico (2002).

Yucuninu: The Development of a Dance

 

(2009)–A documentary by Alison Dobbins following Alicia Díaz’s creative process as she adapts her dance solo Yucuninu (2001) into a trio (2008) performed by three Kent State University dance students. Music by Lila Downs.

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